Blogging for Chiapas

Video: Women in the Zapatista Movement

Check out the first installment of our Teach Chiapas video series! “Women in the Zapatista Movement” is a short video for educators and students that offers a clear introduction to women’s participation in the Zapatista movement in Chiapas, Mexico.

Zapatista snail saying, "We're slow, but we keep going".

What is Zapatista Autonomy?

Autonomy is a word readers and researchers on the Schools for Chiapas website will come across often. It is a key concept of Zapatismo: One will come across autonomous zones, autonomous municipalities, autonomous communities, autonomous education, autonomous health…even an autonomous ambulance! The Zapatista project is defined by the demand for autonomy and it is important to have a clear understanding of the term.

Traditional Mayan musician in a Zapatista center in Chiapas, Mexico.

JBG 2011: Four postcards / Cuatro postales

Older folks, both men and women, accompany the hundreds of youth throughout the celebration. These Zapatista authorities from local municipalities work day and night throughout the celebration. The men cook wonderful food which fuels the sports and cultural work of the students. The women and men serving as local Zapatista government authorities seek advice and direction from the Good Government Board about issues facing their communities.

Comandanta Ramona mural

Ramona Sends Off Subcommander Marcos

Along with a few outsiders and many indigenous Zapatistas, I had the opportunity and the honor to attend the burial and contemplate the human issues that always arise when one is confronted with the finality and continuality of death. Throughout that sunny morning and brilliant afternoon, a tumult of emotions and thoughts and impressions flashed across my consciousness and are still percolating beneath the surface. Although I am still sorting out my feeling, I need to share some impressions from that profound experience.

Zapatistas welcome peace bus

The Zapatour Arrives in Mexico City

Note: This piece was written in 2001 during an important effort by the Zapatista movement to convince the Mexican government to honor and implement the Peace Accords of San Andres. This peace agreement, although signed by the Mexican government and the Zapatistas, is still not implemented and remains the most important issue for the indigenous peoples of Mexico and of those throughout the Americas.